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Bible and Christian Related History

Charles Spurgeon Biography

Charles Spurgeon Biography

By on Aug 28, 2013 in Bible and Christian Related History | 0 comments

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Charles Haddon Spurgeon Born 19 June 1834 Kelvedon, Essex, England Died 31 January 1892 (aged 57) Menton, Alpes-Maritimes, France Nationality British Occupation Pastor, author Religion Christian (Reformed Baptist) (Particular Baptist) Spouse(s) Susannah Spurgeon (néeThompson) (8 January 1856) Children Charles and Thomas Spurgeon(twins) (1856) Parents John and Eliza Spurgeon Charles Haddon (C.H.) Spurgeon (19 June 1834 – 31 January 1892) was a British Particular Baptist preacher. Spurgeon remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is known as the “Prince of Preachers”. He was a strong figure in the Reformed Baptist tradition, defending the Church in agreement with the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith understanding, and opposing the liberal and pragmatic theological tendencies in the Church of his day. It is estimated that in his lifetime, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people,[1][2]Spurgeon was the pastor of the congregation of the New Park Street Chapel (later theMetropolitan Tabernacle) in London for 38 years.[3] He was part of several controversies with the Baptist Union of Great Britain and later had to leave the denomination.[4] In 1857, he started a charity organization which is now called Spurgeon’s and works globally. He also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him posthumously. Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works including sermons, an autobiography, commentaries, books on prayer, devotionals, magazines, poetry, hymns and more.[5][6] Many sermons were transcribed as he spoke and were translated into many languages during his lifetime. Spurgeon produced powerful sermons of penetrating thought and precise exposition. His oratory skills held his listeners spellbound in the Metropolitan Tabernacle and many Christians have discovered Spurgeon’s messages to be among the best in Christian literature.[7] Biography Early life Born in Kelvedon, Essex, Spurgeon’s conversion to Christianity came on 6 January 1850, at age 15. On his way to a scheduled appointment, a snow storm forced him to cut short his intended journey and to turn into a Primitive Methodist chapel in Colchester where “God opened his heart to the salvation message.” The text that moved him was Isaiah 45:22 – “Look unto me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth, for I am God, and there is none else.” Later that year on 4 April 1850, he was admitted to the church at Newmarket. His baptism followed on 3 May in the river Lark, at Isleham. Later that same year he moved to Cambridge, where he later became a Sunday school teacher. He...

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The Martyrdom of Saints Perpetua and Felicitas

The Martyrdom of Saints Perpetua and Felicitas

By on Aug 9, 2013 in Bible and Christian Related History | 1 comment

The Martyrdom of Saints Perpetua and Felicitas This is the prison diary of a young woman martyered in Carthage in 202 or 203 CE. The beginning and ending are related by an editor/narrator; the central text contains the words of Perpetua herself. Read more about the story of Perpetua from our interviews with New Testament scholars. A number of young catechumens were arrested, Revocatus and his fellow slave Felicitas, Saturninus and Secundulus, and with them Vibia Perpetua, a newly married woman of good family and upbringing. Her mother and father were still alive and one of her two brothers was a catechumen like herself. She was about twenty-two years old and had an infant son at the breast. (Now from this point on the entire account of her ordeal is her own, according to her own ideas and in the way that she herself wrote it down.) While we were still under arrest (she said) my father out of love for me was trying to persuade me and shake my resolution. ‘Father,’ said I, ‘do you see this vase here, for example, or waterpot or whatever?’ ‘Yes, I do’, said he. And I told him: ‘Could it be called by any other name than what it is?’ And he said: ‘No.’ ‘Well, so too I cannot be called anything other than what I am, a Christian.’ At this my father was so angered by the word ‘Christian’ that he moved towards me as though he would pluck my eyes out. But he left it at that and departed, vanquished along with his diabolical arguments. For a few days afterwards I gave thanks to the Lord that I was separated from my father, and I was comforted by his absence. During these few days I was baptized, and I was inspired by the Spirit not to ask for any other favour after the water but simply the perseverance of the flesh. A few days later we were lodged in the prison; and I was terrified, as I had never before been in such a dark hole. What a difficult time it was! With the crowd the heat was stifling; then there was the extortion of the soldiers; and to crown all, I...

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History The King James Bible

History The King James Bible

By on Aug 9, 2013 in Bible and Christian Related History | 0 comments

History The King James Bible With the death of Queen Elizabeth I, Prince James VI of Scotland became King James I of England. The Protestant clergy approached the new King in 1604 and announced their desire for a new translation to replace the Bishop’s Bible first printed in1568. They knew that the Geneva Version had won the hearts of the people because of its excellent scholarship, accuracy, and exhaustive commentary. However, they did not want the controversial marginal notes (proclaiming the Pope an Anti-Christ, etc.) Essentially, the leaders of the church desired a Bible for the people, with scriptural references only for word clarification or cross-references. This “translation to end all translations” (for a while at least) was the result of the combined effort of about fifty scholars. They took into consideration: The Tyndale New Testament, The Coverdale Bible, The Matthews Bible, The Great Bible, The Geneva Bible, and even the Rheims New Testament. The great revision of the Bishop’s Bible had begun. From 1605 to 1606the scholars engaged in private research. From 1607 to 1609 the work was assembled. In 1610 the work went to press, and in 1611 the first of the huge (16 inch tall) pulpit folios known today as “The 1611 King James Bible” came off the printing press. A typographical discrepancy in Ruth 3:15 rendered a pronoun “He” instead of “She” in that verse in some printings. This caused some of the 1611 First Editions to be known by collectors as “He” Bibles, and others as “She” Bibles. Starting just one year after the huge 1611 pulpit-size King James Bibles were printed and chained to every church pulpit in England; printing then began on the earliest normal-size printings of the King James Bible. These were produced so individuals could have their own personal copy of the Bible. King JThe Anglican Church’s King James Bible took decades to overcome the more popular Protestant Church’s Geneva Bible. One of the greatest ironies of history, is that many Protestant Christian churches today embrace the King James Bible exclusively as the “only” legitimate English language translation… yet it is not even a Protestant translation! It was printed to compete with the Protestant Geneva Bible, by authorities who throughout most of history were hostile to Protestants… and killed them. While many Protestants are quick to assign the full blame of...

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Samuel Kaboo Morris

Samuel Kaboo Morris

By on Aug 9, 2013 in Bible and Christian Related History | 0 comments

Samuel Kaboo Morris (1873 – May 12, 1893) was a Liberian prince who converted to Christianity around the age of 14. Around age 18, he left Liberia for the United States to achieve an education and arrived at Taylor University in December 1891. There is now a residence hall at Taylor University bearing his name. He died in 1893 from complications of a respiratory infection. Morris’s life has been the subject of five novels, over a dozen biographies, a 1954 film, and a 1988 documentary. Taylor University has named numerous buildings, scholarships, and a society in his honor. His story helped to inspire other people to go to Africa to preach the gospel. Early life Samuel was born in Liberia, in 1873. Little is known of Samuel Morris’s early life. When he was 14 years old, his tribe,(the Kru) was attacked by the Grebos one day and Kaboo was captured. He was used as a “pawn“, meaning the Kru would have to bring the Grebos a present each month if they wanted to see their prince again. His father, the chief, came each time but what he brought was never enough. Finally the Kru could bring no more and Kaboo was beaten every day. One night, though, during one of his beatings, there was a flash of light and a voice told Kaboo to flee. His ropes fell off and his sick body gained strength. He ran off into the jungle, were he wandered for days living off such things as snails and mangos until he came to a coffee plantation owned by a former slave. The slave had come to Liberia and was a Christian. It was this slave that Kaboo worked there with another boy from his village before coming to America. His motivation to come to America was learning more about God and the Holy Spirit. One of the missionaries there told him all she knew. Samuel asked who it was that taught her. She told him it was a man in New York named Stephen Merritt. He decided he would go to New York to find this man. As he walked to the shore he prayed that there would be a boat there that could take him. There was a ship there...

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John Calvin and the Reformation Movement

John Calvin and the Reformation Movement

By on Aug 9, 2013 in Bible and Christian Related History | 0 comments

 Becker Bible Studies Library John Calvin Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and the Founder of Calvinism Introduction: John Calvin was born July 10, 1509 in Noyon, Picardie, France and died May 27, 1564 in Geneva Switzerland. He was a French Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and the founder of Calvinism. He was never ordained into the Roman Priesthood but rather studied Greek and Hebrew and received training in Aristotelian philosophy. Calvin experienced a sudden conversion in the spring of 1532 and the spring of 1534. He believed God had changed his course and religion was placed first in his heart and in his thoughts. John Calvin published numerous revisions of his Institutes of the Christian Religion. He also produced a commentary on most of the books of the Bible. He did not publish commentaries on the books after Joshua; with the exception of First Samuel and the Wisdom literature and the Book of Psalms. Calvin excluded the second and third Epistles of John and the Book of Revelation. John Calvin was the founder of Calvinism. He believed in a reformed church. His theological system spread to Scotland, the Netherlands, parts of Germany and France, Hungary, and Poland. Calvinism then spread to America and the Mid Atlantic, New England. The Puritans and Dutch settlers of New Amsterdam, which later became New York, were Calvinists. Calvin founded a school for training children and set up a hospital for the indigents in 1559. He considered himself a pastor and theologian and an influential thinker who sought to apply Biblical principles to every aspect of life. He was never considered a popular theologian. The historians portray Calvin as being cold, unfeeling and stern to his followers. They fault Calvin for demanding his followers to be obedient and severely punishing the slightest deviation from his strict moral code. The historians often defend their opinion of John Calvin through the example of his approval for the execution of Michael Servetue, who was one of the founders of Unitarianism, in 1553. Michael Servetur, a Spanish physician and theologian who argued powerfully and effectively against Trinitaria, was executed for heresy after being reported by Calvin. Servetus had escaped the Catholic Inquisition and appeared in Geneva...

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Jonathan Edwards Biography

Jonathan Edwards Biography

By on Aug 9, 2013 in Bible and Christian Related History | 0 comments

Biography Source: Wikipedia Edwards was born in East Windsor, Connecticut, to Timothy Edwards, pastor of East Windsor, and Esther Edwards.The only son in a family of eleven children, he entered Yale in September, 1716 when he was not yet thirteen and graduated four years later (1720) as valedictorian. He received his Masters three years later. As a youth, Edwards was unable to accept the Calvinist sovereignty of God. He once wrote, “From my childhood up my mind had been full of objections against the doctrine of God’s sovereignty… It used to appear like a horrible doctrine to me.” However, in 1721 he came to the conviction, one he called a “delightful conviction.” He was meditating on 1 Timothy 1:17, and later remarked, “As I read the words, there came into my soul, and was as it were diffused through it, a sense of the glory of the Divine Being; a new sense, quite different from any thing I ever experienced before… I thought with myself, how excellent a Being that was, and how happy I should be, if I might enjoy that God, and be rapt up to him in heaven; and be as it were swallowed up in him for ever!” From that point on, Edwards delighted in the sovereignty of God. Edwards later recognized this as his conversion to Christ. In 1727 he was ordained minister at Northampton and assistant to his maternal grandfather, Solomon Stoddard. He was a student minister, not a visiting pastor, his rule being thirteen hours of study a day. In the same year, he married Sarah Pierpont, then age seventeen, daughter of James Pierpont (1659–1714), a founder of Yale, originally called the Collegiate School. In total, Jonathan and Sarah had eleven children. Solomon Stoddard died on February 11th, 1729, leaving to his grandson the difficult task of the sole ministerial charge of one of the largest and wealthiest congregations in the colony. Throughout his time in Northampton his preaching brought remarkable religious revivals. Jonathan Edwards was a key figure in what has come to be called the First Great Awakening of the 1730s and 1740s. Yet, tensions flamed as Edwards would not continue his grandfather’s practice of open communion. Stoddard, his grandfather,...

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